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It Has Nothing To Do With Age provides self-help principles. The inspirational stories give concrete illustrations of overcoming many of life's challenges. Difficulties pertaining to depression, grief, divorce, and death are presented and worked through by the participants. Physical impairments, injuries, overcoming issues with weight, alcohol, and nicotine are also dealt with and resolved by the athletes.

This book provides a model on how to overcome some of the difficulties that confront all of us . Further, this read sheds a beacon of light on preventive measures for good physical and mental health. Research demonstrates that exercise is an important component in treating such ailments and debilitating illness such as depression, stroke, heart disease, brain or cognitive malfunction,and Alzheimer's disease.

I suggest that proper exercise can be used as a preventive measure for psychological, cognitive, and physical health as well. Follow my prescription and lead a better, more fulfilling, and healthier life.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Harbaugh and Schembechler

Jim Harbaugh, the current University of Michigan football coach, arrived in Ann Arbor on December of 2014, at age 51, with tremendous enthusiasm by all. Can he become the greatest football coach in the “ modern era” in Wolverine history? Currently, that title belongs to none other than Bo Schembechler. Bo Schembechler, age 39, was seen in Ann Arbor in December over 49 years ago, in 1968. He was not greeted with an overabundance of adoring enthusiasm. In fact, the new athletic director Don Canham fired All American, Rose Bowl player and Rose Bowl winning coach Bump Elliott, beloved by all. This icon, in fact, led the Wolverines to an 8-2 won loss record in 1968. However, the mortal wound that led to his dismissal was the unmerciful beating by Woody Hayes and his Ohio State Buckeyes that season by a score of 50 to 14 in Columbus. Other factors that played a part in Bump’s dismissal, was the lack of interest in Michigan Football. There were many diversions for the students and alumni during those tumultuous years - political assassinations, race riots, Vietnam War and changes in social and sexual mores. That 1969 football season didn’t start off well for coach Schembechler, as Bumps, former players severely didn’t like Bo. They were neither buying into his coaching nor conditioning methods nor his offensive and defensive football philosophy. The team, that season, was struggling with a 3-2 record during their first five games, and were behind in the first half of their sixth game against the University of Minnesota. Bo, with a soft-spoken voice, told the warriors at halftime “We are the better team and do not to waste this opportunity.” Bo’s players united as they became “the team.” They then demolished the Gophers, followed by thrashing Illinois and Iowa, in that order. They were now ready for the revenge and showdown against Woody’s Buckeyes on that wintry November 22, 1969 game in front of 103,588 fans. Thus, Bo Schembechler, on that infamous Saturday, in Ann Arbor, began his quest, his identity and eventually he became the legend. Bo led his Wolverines for the next 21 years, with sellouts in the Big House; 234 victories and 65 losses and eight ties; winning or sharing 13 Big Ten conference titles during his realm. While leading the Wolverines during this glorious time, he was the winningest football coach in the nation. And he alone has a statue in front of Schembechler Hall. To Be Continued


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