Subscribe to It Has Nothing to Do with Age by Email Follow Tusk95664 on Twitter It Has Nothing to Do with Age: Samson and Hercules Part 5
It Has Nothing To Do With Age provides self-help principles. The inspirational stories give concrete illustrations of overcoming many of life's challenges. Difficulties pertaining to depression, grief, divorce, and death are presented and worked through by the participants. Physical impairments, injuries, overcoming issues with weight, alcohol, and nicotine are also dealt with and resolved by the athletes.

This book provides a model on how to overcome some of the difficulties that confront all of us . Further, this read sheds a beacon of light on preventive measures for good physical and mental health. Research demonstrates that exercise is an important component in treating such ailments and debilitating illness such as depression, stroke, heart disease, brain or cognitive malfunction,and Alzheimer's disease.

I suggest that proper exercise can be used as a preventive measure for psychological, cognitive, and physical health as well. Follow my prescription and lead a better, more fulfilling, and healthier life.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Samson and Hercules Part 5

The second component of exercise [Weight training, sprinting, swimming, rowing, tennis, yoga, isometrics, martial arts, squash, basketball] have to do with strength and muscular development. Everyone knows that activity is good, which means there’s no problem with assimilation. The problem again is with accommodation or follow through in spite of the barrier. Once again, we’re talking about something that’s very difficult to accomplish and keeping with it. This means sweating, straining, muscles that burn, and even inflicting some form of pain or punishment upon oneself (abasement}. It’s easy to rationalize, employ denial or intellectualization defenses prior to beginning an exercise with self-talk as “I don’t feel like it;” “I’ll do it tomorrow;” “one day off won’t matter;” etc. However, once beginning an exercise, often changes the dynamics but not always. Repetition, repetition, repetition is paramount for success. I have heard often “I can’t run because of my bad knees.” With a knee replacement, one can do brisk walking, or strenuous hiking. I know someone with a hip replacement that still runs. There is no substitute, no shortcut or no pill to take, when it comes to exercise. Reframe the word and call it “conditioning for life.” Also important, is that the exercise goal has to have an emotional component tied to a major need or needs; provides meaning and becomes a way of life. If it takes on a positive addictive quality, then this kaleidoscope of motivations makes it difficult to stop because then the fear of failure becomes another motivator “if I stop, I’ll become fat,” “I’m not progressing fast enough.” An individual who enjoyed sports and physical activity, much earlier in life has a better chance of awakening what has lied dormant for many years. The activity becomes a rebirth or new beginning. In other words, the strength, valence, and importance of the motives allows it to overcome and penetrate our barriers regardless of their size, height or length. The mastery or mental toughness necessary to overcome and stay the course becomes self-reinforcing and leads to realistic expectations and to Samson and Hercules, like accomplishments. Jim Steere, DMV, Lew Hollander, PhD, Jack Sholl, Doc Shay, Sammy Stanbro, Beverlee Bentley and Russ Kiernan , my first ride and tie partner come to mind. They pushed their physical, mental and emotional limits to unfathomable levels. And as award-winning sports author Peter Golenbock stated “their stories are about the unbelievable or impossible …..” To Be Continued


Post a Comment