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It Has Nothing To Do With Age provides self-help principles. The inspirational stories give concrete illustrations of overcoming many of life's challenges. Difficulties pertaining to depression, grief, divorce, and death are presented and worked through by the participants. Physical impairments, injuries, overcoming issues with weight, alcohol, and nicotine are also dealt with and resolved by the athletes.

This book provides a model on how to overcome some of the difficulties that confront all of us . Further, this read sheds a beacon of light on preventive measures for good physical and mental health. Research demonstrates that exercise is an important component in treating such ailments and debilitating illness such as depression, stroke, heart disease, brain or cognitive malfunction,and Alzheimer's disease.

I suggest that proper exercise can be used as a preventive measure for psychological, cognitive, and physical health as well. Follow my prescription and lead a better, more fulfilling, and healthier life.

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Dopamine, Food and Drugs Part 2

To make a long story short, an individual low in dopamine has little joy for life and little energy. These individuals then pursue such activities and abuse caffeine, alcohol, sugar, drugs, shopping, sex, video games, online porn, power, and gambling for additional dopamine release. More specifically, nicotine boosts dopamine by 200%, cocaine 400% and amphetamines, 1000%. These behavioral choices assist us in getting through the day, but they are not permanent solutions. It is believed, that the dopamine neurotransmitter acts like a reward system or stimulus that induces appetitive or approach behavior. It also induces consummatory behavior as well. To simplify, wanting, desire, or seeking is associated with approach behavior while liking or pleasure is associated with consummatory behavior. 59,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2016. In a 2015 article, it was reported that middle-class whites have experienced alarming increases in mortality since 1990s. This group was largely driven by despair, suicide, alcohol ,and drugs abuse. Another study found that a lower social status, coupled with less perceived social support [stress] was correlated with fewer dopamine [D 2’s] in the brain’s reward circuit. Another study found that D 2 was linked with lower activity in the prefrontal cortex, which impairs one’s ability to think critically and exercise restraint. Chronic exposure to high-fat sugary foods was also linked with lower D2 levels in people. Individuals with lower D2 levels are more likely to crave such comfort foods. More exposure to such foods results in more craving. Morbidly obese individuals also had reductions in their D2 receptors and that reduction was proportional to their body mass index. Perhaps “the wanting” of reward is that these individuals find normal food consumption insufficiently rewarding. It seems, the more D2 receptors being created; the more dopamine being recirculated; and with the more existing dopamine receptors working better, the higher the natural level of stimulation/ pleasure. Having a positive D2 ratio suggests that one is less likely to go out and compulsively seek recreational drugs, comfort food or engage in other self-destructive behavioral choices. To Be Continued


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